What Happens to Coverage When Employees Reduce Their Hours?

The Section 125 cafeteria plan regulations and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) require employers to take certain actions when an employee reduces hours.

Consider this scenario: An employer has an employee who is reducing hours below 30 hours per week. The employee is performing the same job and duties. The employee was determined to be full-time during the most recent measurement period. The employee is currently in a stability period.

What happens when the employee reduces hours during a stability period?

Answer: The employee must be offered coverage through the entire stability period. The employee must remain classified as full-time for the rest of the stability period. An employee’s full-time status determined in the measurement period determines the employee’s status during the subsequent stability period. This is true regardless of why the individual’s hours were reduced, or who chose to reduce the hours.

For information on when an employee can drop employer-based coverage or what happens when an employee transfers to a new part-time job, request UBA???s Compliance Advisor, ???Frequently Asked Questions about Employees’ Reduction in Hours???.

Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com

Health Plan PCORI Fees Are Due July 31

Do you offer coverage to your employees through a self-insured group health plan? Do you sponsor a Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA)? If so, do you know whether your plan or HRA is subject to the annual Patient-Centered Research Outcomes Institute (PCORI) fee? This article answers frequently-asked questions about the PCORI fee, which plans are affected, and what you need to do as the employer sponsor. PCORI fees for 2016 health plans and HRAs are due July 31, 2017.

What is the PCORI fee?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) created the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to study clinical effectiveness and health outcomes. To finance the nonprofit institute???s work, a small annual fee is charged on health plans.

Most employers do not have to take any action, because most employer-sponsored health plans are provided through group insurance contracts. For insured plans, the carrier is responsible for the PCORI fee and the employer has no duties. If, however, you are an employer that self-insures a health plan or an HRA, it is your responsibility to determine whether PCORI applies and, if so, to calculate, report, and pay the fee.

The annual PCORI fee is equal to the average number of lives covered during the health plan year, multiplied by the applicable dollar amount:

  • If the plan year end date was between January 1 and September 30, 2016: $2.17.
  • If the plan year end date was between October 1 and December 31, 2016: $2.26.

Payment is due by July 31 following the end of the calendar year in which the plan year ended. Therefore, for plan years ending in 2016, payment is due no later than July 31, 2017.

Does the PCORI fee apply to all health plans?

The fee applies to all health plans and HRAs, excluding the following:

  • Plans that primarily provide ???excepted benefits??? (e.g., stand-alone dental and vision plans, most health flexible spending accounts with little or no employer contributions, and certain supplemental or gap-type plans).
  • Plans that do not provide significant benefits for medical care or treatment (e.g., employee assistance, disease management, and wellness programs).
  • Stop-loss insurance policies.
  • Health savings accounts (HSAs).

The IRS provides a helpful??chart??indicating the types of health plans that are, or are not, subject to the PCORI fee.

If I have multiple self-insured plans, does the fee apply to each one?

Yes. For instance, if you self-insure one medical plan for active employees and another medical plan for retirees, you will need to calculate, report, and pay the fee for each plan. There is an exception, though, for ???multiple self-insured arrangements??? that are sponsored by the same employer, cover the same participants, and have the same plan year. For example, if you self-insure a medical plan with a self-insured prescription drug plan, you would pay the PCORI fee only once with respect to the combined plan.

Does the fee apply to HRAs?

Yes, the PCORI fee applies to HRAs, which are self-insured health plans, although the fee is waived in some cases. If you self-insure another plan, such as a major medical or high deductible plan, and the HRA is merely a component of that plan, you do not have to pay the PCORI fee separately for the HRA. In other words, when the HRA is integrated with another self-insured plan, you only pay the fee once for the combined plan.

On the other hand, if the HRA stands alone, or if the HRA is integrated with an insured plan, you are responsible for paying the fee for the HRA.

Can I use ERISA plan assets or employee contribution to pay the fee?

No. The PCORI fee is an employer expense and not a plan expense, so you cannot use ERISA plan assets or employee contributions to pay the fee. (An exception is allowed for certain multi-employer plans (e.g., union trusts) subject to collective bargaining.) Since the fee is paid by the employer as a business expense, it is tax deductible.

How do I calculate the fee?

Multiply $2.17 or $2.26 (depending on the date the plan year ended in 2016) times the average number of lives covered during the plan year. ???Covered lives??? are all participants, including employees, dependents, retirees, and COBRA enrollees. You may use any one of the following counting methods to determine the average number of lives:

  • Average Count Method:??Count the number of lives covered on each day of the plan year, then divide by the number of days in the plan year.
  • Snapshot Method:??Count the number of lives covered on the same day each quarter, then divide by the number of quarters (e.g., four). Or count the lives covered on the first of each month, then divide by the number of months (e.g., 12). This method also allows the option???called the ???snapshot factor method??????of counting each primary enrollee (e.g., employee) with single coverage as ???1??? and counting each primary enrollee with family coverage as ???2.35.???
  • Form 5500 Method:??Add together the ???beginning of plan year??? and ???end of plan year??? participant counts reported on the Form 5500 for the plan year. There is no need to count dependents using this method since the IRS assumes the sum of the beginning and ending of year counts is close enough to the total number of covered lives. If the plan is employee-only without dependent coverage, divide the sum by 2. (If Form 5500 for the plan year ending in 2016 is not filed by July 31, 2017, you cannot use this counting method.)

For an HRA, count only the number of primary participants (employees) and disregard any dependents.

How do I report and pay the fee?

Use??Form 720, Quarterly Excise Tax Return, to report and pay the annual PCORI fee. Report all information for self-insured plan(s) with plan year ending dates in 2016 on the same Form 720. Do not submit more than one Form 720 for the same period with the same Employer Identification Number (EIN), unless you are filing an amended return.

The IRS provides??Instructions for Form 720. Here is a quick summary of the items for PCORI:

  • Fill in the employer information at the top of the form.
  • In Part II, complete line 133(c) and/or line 133(d), as applicable, depending on the plan year ending date(s). If you are reporting multiple plans on the same line, combine the information.
  • In Part II, complete line 2 (total)
  • In Part III, complete lines 3 and 10.
  • Sign and date Form 720 where indicated.
  • If paying by check or money order, also complete the payment voucher (Form 720-V) provided on the last page of Form 720.??Be sure to fill in the circle for ???2nd Quarter.?????Refer to the??instructions??for mailing information.

Caution!??Before taking any action, confirm with your tax department or controller whether your organization files Form 720 for any purposes other than the PCORI fee. For instance, some employers use Form 720 to make quarterly payments for environmental taxes, fuel taxes, or other excise taxes. In that case, do not prepare Form 720 (or the payment voucher), but instead give the PCORI fee information to your organization???s tax preparer to include with its second quarterly filing.

Summary

If you self-insure one or more health plans or sponsor an HRA, you may be responsible for calculating, reporting, and paying annual PCORI fees. The fee is based on the average number of lives covered during the health plan year. The IRS offers a choice of three different counting methods to calculate the plan???s average covered lives. Once you have determined the count, the process for reporting and paying the fee using Form 720 is fairly simple. For plan years ending in 2016, the deadline to file Form 720 and make your payment is July 31, 2017.

Originally published by www.thinkhr.com

Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangements and ERISA

Certain small employers have the option to reimburse individual health coverage premiums up to a dollar limit through Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangements (QSE HRAs) under the 21st Century Cures Act (Cures Act).

The Cures Act amends the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) to exclude QSE HRAs from the ERISA definition of group health plan; however, the Cures Act does not specifically exclude QSE HRAs from the rest of ERISA.

Small employers that plan to offer QSE HRAs should be cautious before presuming that ERISA would not apply to a reimbursement arrangement. Because QSE HRAs are new, the issue of whether the remainder of ERISA applies to QSE HRAs remains undetermined by an administrative agency or court. In consideration of the limited ERISA group health definition exclusion and the law’s legislative history, a risk-averse small employer should treat a QSE HRA as an employee welfare benefit plan covered under ERISA and comply with applicable ERISA requirements such as having a written plan document and summary plan description as well as following ERISA’s fiduciary and other rules.

Request UBA???s Compliance Advisor, ???Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangements and ERISA??? for a discussion of ERISA???s definitions of ???group health plan,??? as well as the law???s legislative history governing exclusions. A small employer who intends to offer a QSE HRA without complying with ERISA’s employee welfare benefit plan requirements should consult with its attorney before proceeding.

Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com

UBA Compliance Recap – May 2017

May was an active month in the employee benefits world. On May 4, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill titled the “American Health Care Act of 2017” (AHCA) to repeal and replace the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released its Employer Shared Responsibility affordability percentage indexed for 2018. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) issued redesigned permanent resident cards and employment authorization documents. The USCIS also issued a warning about phone scams targeting immigrants. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced that it will delay electronic submission of injury and illness records.

The IRS released dollar limits for health savings accounts (HSAs) and high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) for 2018. The IRS released guidance confirming that health flexible spending arrangements (health FSAs) cannot reimburse Medicare premiums. The IRS also released a memo regarding tax treatment of benefits paid under an arrangement that combines a self-funded fixed indemnity heath plan and wellness program.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that it will end the Federally Facilitated SHOP Exchange (FF-SHOP) at the end of 2017. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued an advisory opinion on an employee welfare benefit plan maintained by an association of employers. The U.S. Supreme Court declined to take an opt-out arrangement case, leaving intact a lower court’s decision that opt-out payments must be included in overtime calculations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

UBA Updates

UBA released three new advisors in May:

The House Passes AHCA Bill in First Step to Repeal and Replace the ACA

On May 4, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed House Resolution 1628, a reconciliation bill aimed at “repealing and replacing” the ACA. The AHCA will now be sent to the Senate for debate, where amendments can be made, prior to the Senate voting on the bill.

It is widely anticipated that in its current state the AHCA is unlikely to pass the Senate. Employers should continue to monitor the text of the bill and should refrain from implementing any changes to group health plans in response to the current version of the AHCA.

Read more.

IRS Releases Employer Shared Responsibility Affordability Percentage Indexed for 2018

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released its Revenue Procedure 2017-36 that sets the required contribution percentage to determine whether employer-sponsored health coverage is affordable at 9.56 percent for calendar year 2018.

Human Resources: USCIS Issues Redesigned Green Cards and Employment Authorization Documents

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) began issuing the new Permanent Resident Cards (also known as Green Cards) on May 1, 2017. The new cards incorporate enhanced graphics and fraud-resistant security features. These new cards are also part of an ongoing effort between USCIS, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to enhance document security and deter counterfeiting and fraud.

The new Green Cards and Employment Authorization Documents (EADs):

  • Display the individual’s photos on both sides
  • Show a unique graphic image and color palette:
    • Green Cards will have an image of the Statue of Liberty and a predominately green palette
    • EAD cards will have an image of a bald eagle and a predominately red palette
  • Have embedded holographic images
  • No longer display the individual’s signature

Also, Green Cards will no longer have an optical stripe on the back.

Some Green Cards and EADs issued after May 1, 2017, may still display the existing design format as USCIS will continue using existing card stock until current supplies are depleted. For more information about the Green Card application process, please visit USCIS.gov/greencard.

Human Resources: USCIS Issues a Warning on Phone Scam Targeting U.S. Immigrants

U.S. immigrants have been targeted by a phone scam that appears as if it is from the Canadian government’s Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) call center (1-888-242-2100). Recipients of these calls are advised to hang up immediately and check their status by:

  • Making an InfoPass appointment at http://infopass.uscis.gov, or
  • Using myUSCIS to find up-to-date information about their application, or
  • Calling the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283.

Scam email or phone calls should be reported to the Federal Trade Commission at http://1.usa.gov/1suOHSS. Suspicious emails may be forwarded to the USCIS webmaster at uscis.webmaster@uscis.dhs.gov. The USCIS will review the emails received and share them with law enforcement agencies as appropriate. Visit the Avoid Scams Initiative at www.uscis.gov/avoid-scams for more information on common scams and other important tips.

Human Resources: OSHA Proposes to Delay Electronic Submission of Injury and Illness Records

In 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced that certain high-risk employers of 20 or more employees and employers with 250 or more employees must electronically file Form 300A for workplace illnesses and injuries that occurred in calendar year 2016.

OSHA recently posted a notice on its website stating that “OSHA is not accepting electronic submission of injury and illness logs at this time and intends to propose extending the July 1, 2017 date by which certain employers are required to submit the information from their completed 2016 form 300A electronically.” It should be noted that the requirement to keep records has not changed; only the method in which they are submitted is under scrutiny.

Employers can follow updates at https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/finalrule/index.html

IRS Releases 2018 Amounts for HSAs

The IRS released Revenue Procedure 2017-37 that sets the dollar limits for health savings accounts (HSAs) and high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) for 2018.

For calendar year 2018, the annual contribution limit for an individual with self-only coverage under an HDHP is $3,450, and the annual contribution limit for an individual with family coverage under an HDHP is $6,900.

For calendar year 2018, a “high deductible health plan” is defined as a health plan with an annual deductible that is not less than $1,350 for self-only coverage or $2,700 for family coverage, and the annual out-of-pocket expenses (deductibles, co-payments, and other amounts, but not premiums) do not exceed $6,650 for self-only coverage or $13,300 for family coverage.

IRS Releases Information Letter to Confirm that FSAs Cannot Reimburse Medicare Premiums

The IRS released its Information Letter Number 2017-0004 to confirmed that a health flexible spending arrangement (health FSAs) cannot reimburse Medicare premium expenses. The IRS cited its Publication 969 which states that an FSA cannot reimburse health insurance premium payments. Because Medicare premiums are premiums for other health coverage, Medicare premiums are not FSA-reimbursable expenses.

IRS Releases Memo Regarding Tax Treatment of Benefits Paid by Self-Funded Health Plans

On May 12, 2017, the IRS released a Memorandum to address the taxability of benefits paid under an arrangement that combines a self-funded fixed indemnity heath plan and wellness program. The IRS specifically refutes the claim that these arrangements provide nontaxable cash payments to employees and employment tax savings for the employer and employees.

The IRS concluded that benefits paid under a such an employer-provided self-funded health plan should be included in an employee’s income and wages if the average amounts received by the employee for participating in a health-related activity predictably exceed the employee’s after-tax contributions.

CMS Plans to End SHOP Exchange

On May 15, 2017, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that it will issue rules to essentially end the Federally Facilitated SHOP Exchange (FF-SHOP) at the end of 2017.

Under the rules that CMS intends to propose, HealthCare.gov will continue to make FF-SHOP participation eligibility decisions for small employers regarding the Small Business Health Care Tax Credit, but the FF-SHOP will stop handling SHOP functions, such as processing premium payments or handling employer or employee enrollment, for SHOP plans taking effect on or after on January 1, 2018. CMS intends to allow employers to directly enroll with insurers offering SHOP plans or through FF-SHOP-registered brokers or agents.

DOL Issues Advisory Opinion on Employee Welfare Benefit Plan Sponsored by a Group of Employers

On May 16, 2017, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued its Advisory Opinion to address whether a membership-based organization could fall within ERISA’s definition of “group or association of employers” who sponsor an ERISA employee welfare benefit plan.

Based on the facts presented to the DOL, the DOL concluded that the organization’s membership is comprised of employers engaged in the same industry and that the employers have a genuine organizational relationship unrelated to the health plan through their membership in the organization. The DOL determined, based on the proposed arrangement’s facts, that the participating member employers would be a bona fide group or association of employers under ERISA and that the health plan would be an ERISA employee welfare benefit plan.

U.S. Supreme Court Declines to Take Opt-Out Arrangement FLSA Case

Last year in court case Flores v. City of San Gabriel, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals (which covers several western states including Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington) determined that when an employer pays cash to an employee for opting out of its health plan, the payment must be considered part of the employee’s “regular rate of pay” under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). This means that the adjusted rate of pay must be used in calculating compensation for overtime hours.

The City of San Gabriel appealed the 9th Circuit’s decision to the U.S. Supreme Court. On May 15, 2017, the Supreme Court declined to take the case, essentially leaving the decision intact.

Practically speaking, if an employer is in one of the states covered by the 9th Circuit and if the employer calculates compensation for overtime hours, then it should consider this additional FLSA aspect to offering cash in lieu of benefits.

Question of the Month

Q.?? When is the PCORI fee due?

A.?? The fee is due by July 31 of the year following the calendar year in which the plan/policy year ends. The fee applies from 2012 to 2019, based on plan/policy years ending on or after October 1, 2012, and before October 1, 2019.

 

Is Your Wellness Program Compliant with the ACA, GINA and EEOC?

Workplace wellness programs have increased popularity through the years. According to the most recent UBA Health Plan Survey, 49 percent of firms with 200+ employees offering health benefits in 2016 offered wellness programs. Workplace wellness programs??? popularity also brought controversy and hefty discussions about what works to improve population health and which programs comply with the complex legal standards of multiple institutions that have not really ???talked??? to each other in the past. To ???add wood to the fire,??? the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) made public some legal actions that shook the core of the wellness industry, such as EEOC vs. Honeywell International, and EEOC vs. Orion Energy Systems.

To ensure a wellness program is compliant with the ACA, GINA and the EEOC, let???s first understand what each one of these institutions are.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is a comprehensive healthcare reform law enacted in March 2010 during the Obama presidency. It has three primary goals: to make health insurance available to more people, to expand the Medicaid program, and to support innovative medical care delivery methods to lower the cost of healthcare overall.1 The ACA carries provisions that support the development of wellness programs and determines all rules around them.

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) is a federal law that protects individuals from genetic discrimination in health insurance and employment. GINA relates to wellness programs in different ways, but it particularly relates to the gathering of genetic information via a health risk assessment.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a federal agency that administers and enforces civil rights laws against workplace discrimination. In 2017, the EEOC issued a final rule to amend the regulations implementing Title II of GINA as they relate to employer-sponsored wellness program. This rule addresses the extent to which an employer may offer incentives to employees and spouses.

Here is some advice to ensure your wellness program is compliant with multiple guidelines.

  1. Make sure your wellness program is ???reasonably designed??? and voluntary ??? This means that your program???s main goal should be to promote health and prevent disease for all equally. Additionally, it should not be burdensome for individuals to participate or receive the incentive. This means you must offer reasonable alternatives for qualifying for the incentive, especially for individuals whose medical conditions make it unreasonably difficult to meet specific health-related standards. I always recommend wellness programs be as simple as possible, and before making a change or decision in the wellness program, identify all difficult or unfair situations that might arise from this change, and then run them by your company???s legal counsel and modify the program accordingly before implementing it. An example of a wellness program that is NOT reasonably designed is a program offering a health risk assessment and biometric screening without providing results or follow-up information and advice. A wellness program is also NOT reasonably designed if exists merely to shift costs from an employer to employees based on their health.
  2. Do the math! ??? Recent rules implemented changes in the ACA that increased the maximum permissible wellness program reward from 20 percent to 30 percent of the cost of self-only health coverage (50 percent if the program includes tobacco cessation). Although the final rules are not clear on incentives for spouses, it is expected that, for wellness programs that apply to employees and their spouses, the maximum incentive for either the employee or spouse will be 30 percent of the total cost of self-only coverage. In case an employer offers more than one group health plan but participation in a wellness program is open to all employees regardless of whether they are enrolled in a plan, the employer may offer a maximum incentive of??30 percent of the lowest cost major medical self-only plan it offers. As an example, if a single plan costs $4,000, the maximum incentive would be $1,200.
  3. Provide a notice to all eligible to participate in your wellness program ??? The EEOC made it easy for everyone and posted a sample notice online at https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/regulations/ada-wellness-notice.cfm. Your notice should include information on the incentive amount you are offering for different programs, how you maintain privacy and security of all protected health information (PHI) as well as who to contact if participants have question or concerns.
  4. If using a HRA (health risk assessment), do not include family medical history questions ??? The EEOC final rule, which expands on GINA???s rules, makes it clear that ???an employer is permitted to request information about the current or past health status of an employee’s spouse who is completing a HRA on a voluntary basis, as long as the employer follows GINA rules about requesting genetic information when offering health or genetic services. These rules include requirements that the spouse provide prior, knowing, written, and voluntary authorization for the employer to collect genetic information, just as the employee must do, and that inducements in exchange for this information are limited.???2 Due to the complexity and ???gray areas??? this item can reach, my recommendation is to keep it simple and to leave genetic services and genetic counseling out of a comprehensive wellness program.

WellSteps, a nationwide wellness provider, has a useful tool that everyone can use. Their ???wellness compliance checker??? should not substituted for qualified legal advice, but can be useful for a high level check on how compliant your wellness program is. You can access it at https://www.wellsteps.com/resources/tools.

I often stress the need for all wellness programs to build a strong foundation, which starts with the company???s and leaders??? messages. Your company should launch a wellness program because you value and care about your employees??? (and their families???) health and well-being. Everything you do and say should reflect this philosophy. While I always recommend companies to carefully review all regulations around wellness, I do believe that if your wellness program has a strong foundation based on your corporate social responsibility and your passion for building a healthy workplace, you most likely will be within the walls of all these rules. At the end, a workplace that does wellness the right way has employees who are not motivated by financial incentives, but by their intrinsic motivation to be the best they can be as well as their acceptance that we all must be responsible for our own health, and that all corporations should be responsible for providing the best environment and opportunities for employees to do so.

Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com

House Passes AHCA Bill in First Step to Repeal and Replace the ACA

On May 4, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives passed House Resolution 1628, a reconciliation bill aimed at “repealing and replacing” the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The bill, titled the “American Health Care Act of 2017” or “AHCA,” will now be sent to the Senate for debate, where amendments can be made, prior to the Senate voting on the bill.

It is widely anticipated that in its current state the AHCA is unlikely to pass the Senate. Employers should continue to monitor the text of the bill and should refrain from implementing any changes to group health plans in response to the current version of the AHCA.

The AHCA makes numerous changes to current law, much of which impact the individual market, Medicare, and Medicaid. Some provisions in the AHCA also impact employer group health plans. For example, the AHCA removes both the individual and the employer shared responsibility penalties. The AHCA also pushes implementation of the Cadillac tax to 2025 and permits states to waive essential health benefit (EHB) requirements.

The AHCA removes the $2,500 contribution limit to flexible health spending accounts (FSAs) for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017. It also changes the maximum contribution limits to health savings accounts (HSAs) to the amount of the accompanying high deductible health plan’s deductible and out-of-pocket limitation. The AHCA also provides for both spouses to make catch-up contributions to HSAs.

The AHCA provides for a “continuous health insurance coverage incentive,” which will allow health insurers to charge policyholders an amount equal to 30 percent of the monthly premium in the individual and small group market, if the individual failed to have creditable coverage for 63 or more days during an applicable 12-month look-back period. This provision is slated to begin in 2019, or in the case of a special enrollment period, beginning in plan year 2018. The AHCA also allows states to obtain a waiver and underwrite policies for individuals who do not maintain continuous coverage.

The AHCA would also return permissible age band rating (for purposes of calculating health plan premiums) to the pre-ACA ratio of 5:1, rather than the ACA’s 3:1. This allows older individuals to be charged up to five times more than what younger individuals pay for the same policy, rather than up to the ACA limit of three times more.

It is unknown at this time if the AHCA can pass the Senate, or what might be changed in the text of the bill in order to earn votes in an attempt to pass the bill.

By Danielle Capilla
Originally published by www.ubabenefits.com