Originally posted by Erin Bramblett, HR specialist with Insperity, an HR outsourcing firm on http://ebn.benefitnews.com.

If anyone knows a thing or two about multitasking, it???s benefit managers. From understanding the compliance complexities of the Affordable Care Act to navigating the nuances of ERISA, benefit managers are experts at juggling several priorities. Yet multitasking and having to deal with constant interruptions can negatively affect work quality, according to a recent study from the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

1. Prioritize.

???Prioritize what you need to get done as an employee and do those things early in the day,??? says Bramblett. ???Focus on what needs to get done, whether it???s three things or five things, and focus on those until they???re done.???

2. Create a to-do list.

???Write that bulleted list, include scheduled breaks and cross them off as you complete them. That will help you stay focused,??? advises Bramblett. ???And taking a mental break in between tasks will help employees shift gears a little more easily.???

3. Don???t check social media during the day.

A five-minute break to update your status can easily turn into a 30-minute waste of time, says Bramblett, who advises keeping social media pages closed during the work day. But if you absolutely can???t go all day without seeing what those crazy cats on Instagram are up to, then schedule it as part of your break on your to-do list.

4. Learn the power of ???no.???

???It???s hard to not say ???yes??? to every assignment that comes your way,??? says Bramblett. ???But you???ve got to make sure you???re keeping your to-do list at a realistic level.??? She advises communicating with your team, your boss or your clients to make sure your daily priorities are correct and that you???re finding out which things are most important for you to get done each day.

5. Don???t think you???re capable of multitasking.

???It is scientifically proven that individuals work better when they are single-tasking,??? says Bramblett, citing an American Psychological Association study that showed multitasking undermines efficiency by as much as 40%.

6. Create a workplace that doesn???t expect multitasking.

???If employees feel like they have to multitask because their boss keeps coming at them with multiple projects and asking for updates on 15 different things in a day, that would certainly be something that would create that environment so you want to ensure you create that work-life balance,??? advises Bramblett.